#210: Gelatinous Overlords

#210: Gelatinous Overlords

Today’s comic is a collaborative effort by my bro Jaron and I. One afternoon over the holidays one of us drew one half of the comic, and then the other of us drew the other half (feel free to guess which drew which).

Incidentally, apparently some scientists really are claiming that the oceans may soon be ruled by jellyfish. And making things worse, there is a species of jellyfish that has apparently evolved immortality. The good news is that jellyfish are edible… and who knows, perhaps they actually do go well with a little peanut butter.


Discussion (9)¬

  1. Dave says:

    Immorality eh?
    So it’s going to start having public orgies on the beach?

  2. loqk says:

    as eating the heart of your enemy gives you his strength, perhaps eating immortal jellyfish will give us our long sought after immortality.

    or stings…. I’m gonna go with stings.

  3. chaospet says:

    Haha, oops Dave, typo. Jellyfish evolving immorality isn’t very newsworthy, they did that many millions of years ago.

    loqk, we can only hope…

  4. Emil says:

    It isn’t even immortality. Immortality is the impossibility of dying. Tho Wiktionary reports that it can also mean not dying of aging (or just not aging at all). But it seems to me that this usage is not very common. I looked it up in the Oxford Concise Dictionary which confirms my suspicions.

  5. chaospet says:

    As is so often the case, “Highlander” points the way to the truth. Characters like Connor MacLeod are referred to as immortal, because they are ageless – but it is certainly not impossible to kill them. They can be killed if you remove their heads, and with it, their power.

  6. Wm Tanksley says:

    Some people hope to achieve immortality through the magnificence of their works. Personally, I hope to achieve immortality through not dying.
    — (a quote which is entirely original to me, not copied in any way from Woody Allen)
    Oh, and Emil — the elves in Tolkien are called immortal, although they certainly die in battle. The word just doesn’t mean what it used to, back when we were young.

  7. Emil says:

    I am still young. 😉 It seems that the english word has moved away (in meaning) from it’s (now non-) danish equivalent “udødelig”.

  8. Abeo says:

    Another point of reference: many ancient deities are referred to as “immortal” but they still died occasionally. Granted, it was much more common for them to be only mostly dead.

  9. Cassie says:

    Everyone is going on about immortality. Really I think we’re missing the point here: new Overlords! Yay!